From the Studio

view from studioToday in glorious weather the view from my studio on Monte Asprano is distracting. This morning began with a brisk 6am walk. This afternoon I was high up on Colle Abate, a rocky but not too difficult climb. The heat of the sun was eased by a fresh and welcome breeze. Tonight the fireflies will entice me outside again. Two little dogs love being nearby, keeping me company as I work. I am counting my blessings and feeling grateful for my interesting life.

Photograph: early morning vista from my studio window.

I Can Do That

blog drawing linesWhat is perfection, and should we aspire to it? My illustrations show action, colour, empathy, but never perfection. It is not my aim. It is important to me that my art for children is ‘accessible’.

I like to imagine that with pencil, paper, pen, paint and water, they too could begin to illustrate their own stories. I imagine a classroom teacher saying to the little ones “Can you see the pencil lines? What do you think she did next, after drawing the picture?”

I could remove all the pencil lines when the paint holds the form. In fact, I did remove most of them, but then added some again. If you look closely at the image you might see where some have been lightly erased, where the wrist and the sleeve meet. It is a calculated choice, what to leave, what to erase, what to put back more strongly to be read in the picture. It is this kind of interpretive interaction that brings out the creativity in little ones. And, perhaps, in the big ones too.

Once the brain engages with a process, or with imagining what might be in a space, the imagination is captured and brought into play. I don’t think that happens quite so much when everything is perfect; you are more likely to look, appreciate, and move on without actively engaging with the creative process.

As with all art work, illustrations have at least three aspects; what the artist intends, what the viewer sees, and what happens in the space in between. In shared reading there is yet another dimension, with the reader leading the discussion. I have considered putting in a page of discussion starters at the end of my stories, and more educational facts that I find in my research, but so far (apart from in the true story, Michelle and the Bumblebee) I have resisted this temptation. The readers will find what they are ready for, when the time is right.

But I digress. Back to the illustrations. In this digital age I think it is important that young children look at original art, and at the process of creating art. Art that is not ‘perfect’ with every line defined, every colour and shading transition smooth. I would like children to see my construction lines, and to think “I can do that”.

jamie helping Nonna blogSharing the process with a young reader. Quality time for both of us 🙂

Three titles released today!

Today is a “Red Letter” day for Little Goat Books. An independent publisher using the Print-on-Demand services of Lulu.com,

Little Goat Books proudly announces that the first three titles produced for 2015 are now available (online only).

Front cover, The Lost Happy
The Lost Happy

Available now: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/littlegoatbooks

front cover final
Michelle and the Bumblebee

Available now: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/littlegoatbooks

blog Bath book
When Mum Fell Asleep in the Bath

 Available now: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/littlegoatbooks